The Press of Atlantic City team (seated L-R), education reporter Claire Lowe, health/medical reporter Nicole Leonard, (standing L-R), public safety reporter Molly Bilinski, managing editor W.F. “Buzz” Keough, (inset), staff reporter Erin Serpico.

The Press of Atlantic City team (seated L-R), education reporter Claire Lowe, health/medical reporter Nicole Leonard, (standing L-R), public safety reporter Molly Bilinski, managing editor W.F. “Buzz” Keough, (inset), staff reporter Erin Serpico.

Nearly two years ago, a series of brutal murders involving domestic violence claimed the lives of three South Jersey women in just a month’s time. These senseless acts – committed by men against the partners they should have been protecting – not only claimed the lives of three people, they also devastated families on both sides, and affected communities. They also struck a chord in our newsroom, where we’d been struggling to find a way to adequately portray what was happening.

That struggle led to a commitment to examine the issues of partner violence.  Our project, Breaking the Cycle, formed under the direction of our Executive Editor Kris Worrell, has been a sustained effort to explore the issue and seek answers well beyond the initial crime and punishment. Instead our team of journalists have devoted their energy to trends in treatment, justice and solution-oriented approaches. 

We have learned many things, some discouraging, but others that have offered hope. We’ve published regularly and on many different platforms – video, print, digital and visually, so as to reach as many people. Our goal was to provide context, suggest solutions and above all, ignite a conversation that would lead to change. While we now understand the complexity and challenges holding back progress, we’re encouraged by the community’s response to our efforts. Read More.


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what Men can do to help stop domestic violence. 

While men are responsible for the majority of domestic violence, it is important that we recognize the majority of men are not abusive in their relationships.  Non-abusive men may not realize it but they have the potential to make an enormous difference in helping to stop domestic violence and sexual assault. Read More.